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Customer Success Meeting Templates

The ultimate pack of customer success meeting agenda templates
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Better Meetings. Happier Customers. Less Churn.

Customer relationships are the foundation of customer success, and for many CS professionals, meetings are how you building those relationships. But while meetings may be the best way to get facetime (virtual or otherwise), each customer session needs to be run effectively. Customers want to know that you value their time, and there’s no better way to do that than to set a clear agenda for every meeting.

This is our library of agenda templates for all of the most common meetings that customer success professionals attend, from discovery calls all the way to helping customers thrive in your product. The agenda templates below are pulled from our library of 80+ meeting agendas which you may find helpful for your other meetings as well. 👇

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Client Check-In

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Video conferencing link:

Dial-in number:

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Welcome

Customer — What's new?

Anything to report that we should know?

Updates

Here's where we're at.

Discussion

What new topics need to be discussed?

Customer Questions

Any concerns, questions, or roadblocks?

Next Steps


Customer Feedback

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Quick Review

What does the customer use our product for? What challenges does it solve?

Session Objective

What is the purpose of this meeting? Do you want to focus on certain aspects of the product?

General Product Performance

From 1-5, how well does our product suit the customer's needs?

Favorite Benefits

What are the customer's favorite features and benefits at the moment?

Room for Improvement

How can we make the customer's experience better? How would the customer change our product?

Feature Requests

Did the customer have any feature requests? Turn this list into tickets for the appropriate teams right from here.

Bugs

Did the customer mention any product bugs, errors, or issues? Share these with the appropriate teams right from here.

Key Takeaways

In 3 bullet points or less, what were your main insights from this customer feedback session?

Customer Hand-Off

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Team Information

Customer Success Manager:

Sales Team Member:

Other Key Stakeholders & Their Roles:

Customer Background

Customer Name:

Industry/Sector:

Company Size:

Contract Sign Date:

Contract Length:

Customer Goals

What is the main business objective of the customer? How do they generate revenue?

Why Our Solution?

What challenges or pain points does our product solve for the customer? What benefits or features are they most interested in?

Defining Success

How does the customer define success? What are the short-term objectives (and their steps) to help us get there?

Key Metrics

How do we measure success along the way? What metrics (such as Average MRR, # of Users, and other KPIs) should be discussed?

Work & Communication Style

What is the customer's ideal working relationship? What is the best way to contact them?

Growth Opportunities

How can we tailor the product or experience to better suit the customer?

Red Flags & Risks

Is the customer migrating from a competitor? Why? Were there any hesitations or hiccups encountered during the sales process? How can we ensure these don’t happen during and after the customer handoff?

Next Steps for Team

List all actionable steps and the team member responsible for each one. Refer to "Defining Success" section for help.

Next Steps for Customer

What are the next steps for the customer? Is any training required?

Other Important Notes

Is there any other information worth sharing?

Effective Customer Meeting

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Customer Roadmap

Develop a roadmap with the customer and all stakeholders showing the pieces of the sales processes that have been started and which ones have been completed. Creating a framework that shows progress and what to expect creates transparency with your customer which leads to better customer outcomes.

Collaboration

Add all the stakeholders to a living document or collaborative meeting note platform and integrate it with your team's CRM (like Salesforce). Your customer should feel like they are a part of the process, whether that be the sales process or ongoing customer partnership.

Progress Updates

Keep a history of the progress along the roadmap to closing a deal to drive the deal. Great living roadmaps of all sales processes are essential to closing deals on time - in every sales process the customer controls the gas and you control the brake.

Questions

Make sure that a customer meeting never ends with a customer having doubts, questions or uncertainty. Encourage your customer to share any concerns, roadblocks or questions.

Next Steps

Where to from here? When's the next meeting? What should happen between now and then?

Gainsight's Quarterly Business Review (QBR)

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Executive Business Review and Purpose 

Outline the purpose of the meeting and briefly go over the topics you will be covering as well as your goals for the next quarter. Make sure to emphasize ROI during your introduction. 

Specific elements of a QBR that may become a standard part of your delivery:

Last Quarter Review

If done regularly, the output of a QBR should include the stated goals for the next 90 days with the intention of reviewing and comparing results against those goals at the next QBR. So the starting point for preparing for a QBR is to review and assess the goals and results for the past quarter.

Support review

  • How many cases were opened and closed
  • Breakout by type and severity
  • Average time to resolution
  • Any currently outstanding

Health scorecard

  • Overall health score
  • Scorecard methodology and results
  • Health score trends

Lifecycle stage

  • Where is the customer today
  • Where were they 90 and 180 days ago
  • What will it take to get to the next stage

Benchmarking

  • How does this customer compare to others
  • Where are they falling short and what needs to happen to get them up to, or past, the benchmark

Product usage

  • What does usage look like along with trends
  • Which features are being used, which aren’t
  • Most active users
  • License deployment and value received

Goals and Recommendations

Outline the goals and recommendations you have for the next quarter and open them up for discussion and approval. Have a concrete plan in place for achieving these goals. 

Summary and Next Steps 

  • Summarize the key priorities and next steps for the upcoming quarter

Sales/Customer Success Hand-off

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Customer Account Information: 

Company Name: 

Industry/Sector:

Company Size:

Contract Sign Date:

Contract Length:

Customer Team Information:

First touch: 

Most engaged user:

Buying Decision Maker:

Team who will be using the product the most:

Internal Team Information:

Customer Success Manager:

Sales Team Member:

Other Key Stakeholders & Their Roles:

Customer High Level Goals

What is the main business objective of the customer? How do they generate revenue?

Why Our Solution?

What challenges or pain points does our product solve for the customer? What benefits or features are they most interested in?

Is the customer migrating from a competitor? Why?

Defining Success (Customer)

How will the customer determine if our product is helping them meet their business goals? 

Defining Success (Internally)

What key metrics will we use to make sure the customer is healthy and we are successful? 

Some suggestions (find this information in Vitally):

NPS Score

Health Score

Average MRR/ARR

Number of Users

Product Usage

Product Setup

Work & Communication Style

What is the customer's ideal working relationship? What is the best way to contact them?

Growth Opportunities

How can we tailor the product or experience to better suit the customer? What features do we want to encourage the customer to use based on their business goals?

Red Flags & Risks

Were there any hesitations or hiccups encountered during the sales process? How can we ensure these don’t happen during and after the customer handoff?

Next Steps for Team

What do we need to do next to keep the customer healthy? List all actionable steps and the team member responsible for each one.

Next Steps for Customer

What are the next steps for the customer? Is any training required? More feature implementation?

Other Important Notes

Is there any other information worth sharing?

Note Actions

Add Vitally for the suggested metrics

Customer Success

Agenda Template FAQs

How do you prepare for a customer meeting?

Whether your next customer meeting is your first or 15th with that client, you need an agenda. To build an agenda, you focus should be on answer these three questions:

  1. What is the current state of the customer’s progress toward their goals?
  2. What issues need to be solved to move the customer closer to their goals?
  3. How can these issues be solved?

How to specifically structure your agenda may vary based on your customer, but our library of 80+ meeting agenda examples should give you a good starting point.

How do you start a customer meeting?

As you get your meeting started, you want to grab everyone’s attention, set expectations, and then launch right into it!

  1. While small-talk is great for building rapport before a meeting, don’t let the chatter go on more than a couple of minutes into the official meeting time
  2. If there are participants who don’t know each other, introduce them (and yourself!)
  3. As you get the meeting started, reaffirm why you’re meeting, and what everyone will get out of it. Spending 20 seconds summarizing the agenda shows that you have and plan and you’re in control
How do you end a customer meeting?

As you wrap up your customer meeting, you should revisit any action items you’ve noted during the meeting and affirm that you’re on top of things. This is a good time to note who will be responsible for what, and when the customer can expect an update.
Then, end on a positive note, showing enthusiasm for your partnership and thanking your customer for their time.

How do you have an amazing first client meeting?

Relax and smile
You may be stressed in an attempt to get started on the right foot. Don’t let that impact your body language (even on video conferencing).
 
Offer something of value for free
In addition to any materials in your welcome package, set the stage for a strong relationship by making an offer. This could be a resource, like a research or an ebook, or it could be to set up a training or consultation. It could even be minor, like providing advice based on the customer and your experience with other customers like them. Whatever it is, find a way to show your client that you’re deeply invested in their success.

Listen more than you speak
You may have landed this client, but you still have a lot to learn about their expectations, goals, and priorities. Ask a lot of questions, and listen actively. Even if you think you already know the answers, being a good listener will help build rapport, and you never know—you may learn something incredibly valuable after all.

Be specific about what you offer and how you can help
A common pitfall in initial client meetings is to be overly general. Instead, now is the time to be specific. What exactly will you do together? Who, how much, how often, measured in what way?

Do you have a guide to running great customer meetings?

As a matter of fact, we do. This short, downloadable guide walks you through running a customer meeting that both strengthens customer relationships and improves company wide collaboration.

Get your free download:
The Art of the Customer Meeting.

How do you run a design meeting?

How to run your design meeting will depend a lot on what kind of design meeting it is. Is this a sync up between just a PM (or other product owner) and the designer? Is it a weekly meeting for the design team? A critique? Or is it a cross-functional meeting, with many stakeholders present?
 
Each of these types of meetings requires a slightly different approach. What is common between them, is a need to be upfront and clear about what the goals of the meeting are (and what they aren’t).

For example, here are some typical examples of design meetings:

  • Brainstorm approaches for an early design
  • Seek feedback on an in-progress design
  • Get buy-in on a nearly completed design
  • Plan, decide, and organize your team’s design process
Should non-designers be invited to a design meeting?

Successful design projects usually need involvement from other stakeholders, but too much meddling can throw a wrench in the design process. As a general rule (that can sometimes be broken), input from non-designers is the most helpful at the beginning and end of a design process.

Early in the project, in the research phase, non-designers can be incredibly helpful. They can clarify how a design will be used, describe customer needs, and reveal requirements that might not be obvious about how the design should be used. If designers have experimented with multiple approaches to a problem, it can be useful to share these sketches early on.

Once the design specifications are clear, however, it’s often a good idea to let designers and project people iterate through the problem in a small team with minimal distraction. It’s during this time that small details can become a distraction for non-designers.

When a design is nearly complete, it’s once again helpful to invite key stakeholders to make sure the design is successful, and get buy-in before more resources are invested in making the design come to life.

How do you have a good team meeting?

Consider what can be removed from your agenda… and your invite list
Possibly the most common complaint about team meetings is that they are a waste of time. So the first step toward having a good team meeting is asking yourself whether everything on your agenda needs to be part of the meeting, and whether everyone needs to be there. By keeping a tight agenda and a smaller group, you’re sending a signal that people’s time is important.

Share your agenda in advance
Speaking of agendas, be prepared. Share your agenda in advance, so that the rest of the team know what will be discussed. This way, they can prepare their thoughts, and the meeting will run smoothly. If you surprise people with topics, those parts of a meeting can take longer.

Let other people talk
Many leaders and executives make the mistake of thinking that if they are running a meeting, they need to talk the whole time. Instead of Presenting on a topic for 30 or 60 minutes, structure your meeting so that others participate and even take the spotlight. 

For a more in-depth structure to follow, check out Vital Meetings, the free guide to having shorter, fewer, and better meetings.

How do you make sure real decisions are made in executive meetings?

With executive time being so valuable, it’s important that exec meetings focus not on information sharing, but rather on discussion that leads to decision-making.

One strategy that works here, is to use action-oriented agendas. For example, instead of an agenda item called, “Priorities for next quarter” make a bold statement on your agenda: “Decide on top 3 priorities for next quarter.” This leaves no wiggle room for failing to meet the goal of the meeting.

If you’re a manager or leader, how much time should you spend in meetings?

If you take a look inside a manager’s calendar, it’s not uncommon to see 50-90% of their time blocked off in meetings. At first glance, this seems to make sense. If your primary function is leadership, should you spend the majority of your time with others? However, this kind of distribution often doesn’t leave enough time for strategic thinking and planning.

If you’re attending lots of meetings out of a need to stay in the loop, a better approach is to ask your team to take notes on important meetings, and share them with you (and other relevant stakeholders). A meeting management platform like Hugo can help, and many managers whose teams use Hugo report spending 20-50% less time in meetings because they can rely on skimming notes for less important meetings instead.

What is an HR meeting?

HR (human resources) is responsible for supporting recruitment, hiring, training, and managing. HR professionals meet with job applicants and current workers to support these goals in a variety of meetings, ranging from job interviews, to trainings, to one-on-one coaching sessions.

What should you do if HR wants to meet with you about your behavior?

If your behavior at work is in the process of being addressed, you may need to meet with HR. This can be a stressful situation, but ultimately, if you handle yourself professionally, you should be able to come out of the meeting in good shape (and keep your job).

Here are a key tips to keep in mind:

  • Request examples of behaviors that need to be addressed
  • Write down any specific requests
  • Ask for clarification to avoid misunderstandings
  • Listen and repeat back what you hear to show you are listening
  • Take ownership of your mistakes
  • Ask for help if you need it
  • Show your commitment by setting clear next steps
  • Stay positive (and avoid being defensive)
  • Say thank you. Be gracious for the opportunity to improve
How do I tell my boss about a bad co-worker?
  • Schedule a meeting so that you know you have private time set aside to have the conversation
  • Focus on the behavior, not the person. Avoid personal attacks and instead focus on what they are doing
  • Show up prepared. Put some thought into what you want to say. Taking notes about the behavior in question may help
  • Stick to the facts, and not what you think someone is thinking/feeling
  • Keep a cool head. Even if the issue is serious, try to avoid arguing, shouting, and cursing
  • Request help in finding a solution
How should you handle yourself in an HR meeting?
  • Focus on the facts of the situation
  • Be calm, even when under pressure
  • Consider other people’s points of view
  • Be aware of negative body language
  • Practice good listening. (Don’t cut anyone off)
  • Make sure your effort matches the importance of the issue. (Don’t go crazy over something small)
Who should be at a marketing meeting?

Invite necessary decision-makers, but don’t cast too wide of a net. Since marketing often involves or impacts a lot of departments, it can be tempting to invite a lot of people to some marketing meetings. Instead, try to pair it down. If someone is being invited to the meeting only as an FYI, send them meeting notes instead.

How do you set an agenda for a marketing meeting?

The common structure for many marketing meetings is the following:

What are common types of marketing meetings?
How do you make team meetings more engaging?

The best meetings involve the whole room, not just one or two presenters. Here are a few ways to encourage more engagement:

  • Ask others to contribute to the agenda. Having a shared agenda helps everyone in the room feel responsible for the meeting’s success.
  • Make small talk as people are settling in. When you show up early, get the conversation flowing instead of burying your head in your laptop or your phone.
  • Don’t do all the talking. Invite fellow participants to lead discussions and provide updates.
  • Give updates before the meeting. Provide materials to review before the meeting so that you can focus on the discussion and decision-making when everyone is together.
  • Do a deep dive into one topic. Focus on a single challenge to tap into the collective intelligence of everyone attending.
  • Keep a sense of humor. Cracking the occasional joke will help meeting participants feel open to expressing their own ideas.
What agenda topics are most common in team meetings?

Team meetings are among the most common and most important meetings in any workplace. Agendas for these types of meetings range wildly, but all topics usually fall into one of these categories:

  • Introductions. If they don’t already, make sure everyone in the room knows who each other are.
  • Updates. Updates are extremely common in team meetings, but often they are also the hog a lot of time without providing a lot of value. Summarize updates on the agenda when possible and keep them brief.
  • Discussions.
  • Decisions. If a decision needs to be reached during the meeting, note it explicitly on the agenda.
  • Next steps. While not a significant part of the agenda, it’s important to always agree on action items from a meeting and who owns them.
What are some fun and cool team meeting ideas?
  • Go around the table with an icebreaker. Get to know each other by having everyone answer the same question.
  • Change up the location. Get out of the conference room and into the break room, or on the lawn outside.
  • Start at a weird time. Pick something memorable like 1:23 pm.
  • Get some exercise. Switch things up during a long meeting by having everyone take a run around the block, do as many pushups they can do, or some other physical activity to get the blood pumping.
  • Pass out prizes. Have a pile or swag, or candy bars, or coffee gift cards up at the front of the room. Whenever someone makes a spectacular contribution, toss them a prize.
What are good questions to ask in a one-on-one?

Personal/rapport-building:

  • What worries you? What keeps you up at night?
  • What are you most excited about?
  • How’s life outside work?
  • What do you like to do on the weekends?
  • Do you feel like you’re making progress on your career goals?
  • What are your big dreams in life outside of work?

Career growth:

  • What skills would you like to develop?
  • Do you feel challenged in your role?
  • Is there any training or education we should be investing in for you?
  • How do you see your role evolving?
  • Do you feel like you’re making progress on your career goals?
  • Who in the company would you like to learn from?

Giving/receiving feedback:

  • Do you feel you’re getting enough feedback?
  • What’s an area where you would like help or coaching?
  • What’s an aspect of your job you’d like to improve?
  • How can I help you be more effective?
  • What is something I can do better?
  • What have past managers done that you’d like me to do as well?
Why have one-on-ones with your employees?

One-on-one meetings have many benefits:

  • Help employees build better relationships with their managers 
  • Provide opportunities for coaching and training
  • Encourage employees to feel valued at work
  • Discuss performance and areas of improvement
  • Find out what employees are (and are not) excited about
  • Learn how managers can better help employees
Who should set the agenda for a one-on-one meeting?

It’s good for the employee to feel ownership of their one-on-one because the meeting is primarily for their benefit. So, rather than having a manager set the agenda every time, the majority of the agenda should be driven by the employee. Of course, there should still be opportunities for managers to lead the conversation, especially when it comes to topics like coaching and performance. Using a meeting notes app that allows for easy, collaborative agendas can help.

Should one-on-one be hyphenated?

Yes. The word one-on-one is always hyphenated, regardless of whether it is used as a noun, adjective, and adverb.

What are other ways to spell one-on-one?

Writing all three hyphenated words out as one-on-one can be tedious. For brevity in your calendar invites, try using: "1:1" or "Name <> Name."

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