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The Ultimate Sales & Partnerships Meeting Templates

Better customer relationships through better meetings
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Leading sales teams use meetings as their secret weapon

When you’re in sales, meetings are where the magic happens. Whether it’s an initial sales call or the one where you close the deal, having great conversations is a key component of your job. But meetings with prospects aren’t the only meetings that you attend. There are also one-on-one and team meetings that you use to drive your company’s internal sales process.

Here we have a library of agenda templates for all of the most common meetings that salespeople attend, from discovery calls all the way to launching a customer. The agenda templates below are pulled from our library of 80+ meeting agendas which you may find helpful for your other meetings as well. 👇

Preview the templates

Customer Launch

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Define Success

What are the customer's main objectives and ideal outcomes? How does our product help? What challenges does it solve for them?

Implementation Strategy

Outline your process for achieving these primary goals. Include actionable steps toward time to first value and milestones afterward. The process should lead back to and align with their ideal outcomes as closely as possible.

Important Information

What features, processes, or aspects of your product does the client need to understand during the customer onboarding process? How can we make this as simple and stress-free as can be?

Set Expectations

Set expectations for each step of the customer onboarding process. Are there any potential setbacks or sticky points the client should be aware of? How will our team help?

Introduce Key Players

Introduce or brief the client on key team members they may interact with during their customer onboarding journey. Who can they reach out to with questions or concerns?

Customer Concerns / Risks

Did any issues or concerns arise during the customer onboarding meeting that could jeopardize engagement or retention? How can we mitigate these risks

Opportunities to Increase Engagement

Were any opportunities to increase spend or engagement identified during the initial customer onboarding meeting?

Main Takeaways

Create a list of takeaways for both your team and the customer. Assign actionable steps to your team. Share key information and implementation process with the customer.

Follow-Up

How will we keep the customer in the loop? Should we schedule a check-in?

General Partner Meeting

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Objective

What is the purpose of this partnership check-in? To review current initiatives? To explore new opportunities?

Progress & Performance Review

  • What is the current status of the partnership and its associated initiatives?
  • Share recent progress, key highlights, and relevant data since the last partnership check-in.
  • What's working well?
  • What could improve?

Opportunities to Increase Value

  • Did you identify any new opportunities to increase the value of the partnership or ensure its success?

Risks / Red Flags

  • What red flags were evident?
  • What blockers are in the way of project progress?
  • Is the partnership at risk?
  • Did the partner share any concerning feedback?

Key Takeaways

  • What were the main insights from this check-in? Note and share them here.

Next Steps

  • Where to from here? Clarify next steps for both parties, who's completing them, and when they should be done by. Note this information here to share.

Next Meeting

Set a date and time for your next partnership check-in.

Initial Partnership Meeting

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Introduction (2 slides)

  • Intro Slide -- summarize your business with clear metrics and elevator pitch
  • Priorities Slide -- your priorities on one side, your thoughts on Partner’s priorities on another side

Partnership Section (4 slides)

  • Partnership Vision --  “sell the long term dream”, graphics a plus
  • Benefits to the Partner -- detail why your ask would be good for THEM
  • Example of Past Partnership -- prior Partnership you’ve done + success metrics
  • Proposed Next Steps

Appendix I -- Company Background (up to 4 slides)

  • Three incremental intro slides
  • One Slide on your company response to COVID-19

Appendix II -- Current Company Partnerships (up to 4 slides)

  • If any relevant 

New Partner Discovery Meeting

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Team Structure

  • How is their sales team aligned?
  • Employee bands; geographies; verticals
  • How do they work with Marketing?   
  • Do they have their own Marketing in BD?

Company Focus

  • Who is their buyer?  User?
  • Verticals where they are strong?
  • Prototypical customer (company brand)?
  • Who are their biggest competitors?

Partners 

  • How do you segment partners?  How do your colleagues think about working with partners?
  • Who are your strongest partners?  What’s the GTM motions with those partners?

Timing + KPIs

  • Is there a specific forcing function that is creating this conversation now?
  • What are the key milestones and next steps?
  • How will you measure the success of this partnership?
  • What do you want to get out of this partnership?

Meeting Follow-up

  • What are the next steps?
  • Send clear action items + a note to the partner in email; assign any tasks in other software
  • Do you need to tell any internal stakeholders?

New Partner Onboarding

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Introductions 

  • Introduce/greet attendees
  • Outline the agenda items 

Value proposition

  • Introducing your company and the products/services you provide 
  • Ask the partner to introduce their company and the products/services they provide
  • Discuss synergies and value proposition

Plan

  • Identify owners for a relationship at both ends
  • Draft joint business plan with owners and timelines. This should include an agreed-upon vision of success, steps required to achieve success, timeline, communication or reporting agreement etc

End

  • Setup follow up cadence, date and meeting

One-on-One: Sales Executive

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Business Update

Review sales targets and performance goals against actual performance. Contextualize the numbers. Review your position in the competitive landscape—are we where we want to be?

Analyze Obstacles and Successes

What’s working? Can/should we invest more in what’s working? 

What’s not working? Should we change course? What needs to happen to make it work? (i.e. more resources, alternate organizational structure, etc.) 

New Opportunities

What new market opportunities have us excited? How can we capitalize?  

Upcoming Initiatives

What new sales and marketing campaigns are coming up? Do we have the proper resources in place to execute on these initiatives?

Open Floor

Provide time for open discussion. Is there anything else you want to talk about? 

Follow-Up

Should we schedule another one-on-one?
--

Action Items:


Other Notes:


One-on-One: Sales Leader and SDR

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Kickoff question

Start with an open-ended question. How was last week? What’s been working well for you lately? 

Celebrate Wins

What have we accomplished since our last meeting? Note progress on important accounts or sales targets.

Problem Solving

Are you facing any specific problems? How can we solve them? What support do you need? Problem-solve specific situations and create action items.

Evaluate and Provide Feedback

How are we doing? Are we headed in the right direction? How can we (SDR and/or Sales Leader) be better? 

Personal and Professional Growth

Are we supporting your personal and professional goals? If not, how can we? 

Open Floor

Provide time for open discussion. Is there anything else you want to talk about? 

Follow-Up

How will we keep in touch and stay up-to-date about progress? Should we schedule another one-on-one?

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Action Items:


Other Notes:


Partnership Check-in

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Key points to cover/know going in

  • List out the most important information you need to know before entering the meeting (i.e. they're considering a competitor, we're making a major update to the integration, new key hire, etc.)

Agenda

  • Introductions
  • Mutual Progress and Roadmap Updates

May want to include company level updates that may be interesting/spur ideas or a product/service overview if appropriate

  • Integration Discussion

Product focused discussion on current or prospective integration

  • Go To Market Discussion

Co-marketing, how can we promote the partnership and/or how have promotions fared

  • Open Q&A

List your questions and any they may have had from prior convos

Takeaways

Raw notes go here before you consolidate in to bullet points

Next Steps

Partnership Discovery

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Potential Partner Information

Industry/Sector:

Company Size:

Potential Partner Background

What problem does the potential partner solve for their clients? What are their past successes? What's their reputation?

Partnership Objectives

What do we want to achieve with this partnership? What does the other party want to achieve?

Opportunity / Potential Value

What is the opportunity for both of our organizations? What value do we provide each other? How do we help each other achieve our respective objectives?

Defining Success

How does each party define success? What are the steps required from each of us to accomplish this? What will be the criteria to measure success?

Timeline

What is the timeline for this collaboration? When would each party have to deliver by?

Work & Communication Style

What is each party's ideal working relationship? What is the best way to contact each other?

Risks / Red Flags

Were any key factors identified that could block progress or prevent the partnership from being successful?

Likelihood

Do you believe this partnership is viable and should occur? What is the partner's level of interest?

Key Takeaways

What were the main insights from this partnership discovery meeting? Note and share them here.

Next Steps

Where to from here? Clarify and list all actionable steps for both parties, who's completing them, and when they should be done by. List all actionable steps here to share.

Sales Call

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What are you selling and to who?

Don't forget this fundamental question to ensure your call achieves its outcome.

What is the customer looking for? Why?

Consider the job-to-be-done. What is the customer looking to achieve?

How many users will they have? Who will be using the product?

Which roles, types of users and departments?

What are they using today?

Which product, solution or workaround will your product be replacing?

What are they comparing your product to?

This is an important consideration so you can convey value over the alternative.

What questions did the customer have? How did you answer them?

Make sure you capture these questions to understand what the customer needs to know, and how you could improve your pitch next time.

Any product feedback to note?

Sales calls are a great source of bugs, feature requests, and improvements to pass on to the rest of the team.

Sales Conversation

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Objective

What is the purpose of this meeting? How does it factor into our sales funnel? Is it for initial awareness or to close the sale? List any objectives or main talking points.

Quick Review

Give an overview of where this lead is in our sales process. Mention key context (goals, pain points, how our solution helps, timeline, etc.) that would allow other team members to gain an up-to-date, accurate understanding of the prospect.

Information Shared

What new information or material did you provide the prospect during this sales conversation?

Feedback

How was the new information received by the prospect? What was their response?

Positive Highlights

Note any substantial progress made during this sales conversation.

Risks & Red Flags

Identify any potential issues or concerns that could lead to prospect disengagement or undermine the sales potential.

Other Helpful Notes

Are there any other discussion points you should note and share with colleagues? Mention any changes or new information that could affect the sales or implementation process.

Main Takeaways

Where does the prospect now stand in our sales process? Why?

Take Action

What are the next steps? Share key information and actionable steps with your team and the prospect if necessary.

Sales Meeting Agenda

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General Review

Share updates on overall progress, key metrics, and anecdotes to give your team an up-to-date understanding of current initiatives.

Individual Reports

Let each team member provide a quick update of deal statuses, outreach progress, and other endeavors since the last sales meeting. Note any key information here.

Positive Highlights

Acknowledge big wins and milestones accomplished since the last meeting. What valuable lessons were learned?

Roadblocks & Concerns

Have any issues or challenges come up since the last team catch-up? How can we help solve them?

New Information

Cover any new information the team should be aware of. This includes company announcements, industry news, and any unforeseen developments.

Education & Resources

Are there any new metrics, trends, customer feedback, or market influences we should be aware of? Are there any resources that would help the team understand these concepts better?

Other Important Notes

Was any other valuable information shared? It does not have to be directly related to the meeting topic. Summarize these discussion points here.

Main Takeaways

What were the main insights from this sales meeting? Include key decisions made, progress reports, and any opportunities or issues that should be shared.

Take Action

What are the upcoming objectives for the entire team as well as each individual? Clarify next steps, who's completing them, and when they should be done by. Note this information here to share and assign.

Follow-Up

How will we keep in touch and stay up-to-date about progress? Should we schedule another meeting?

Sales Qualification

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Background

Get a high-level overview of the lead to gauge how well they match your ideal customer profile. What do they do? What industry are they in? How big is their company?

Context

How did they find out about us? What compelled them to approach us? Are they a referral? Did they see an ad?

Define Success

What are the prospect's main objectives and ideal outcomes (both qualitative and quantitative)? How does our product help?

Pain Points

What are the prospect's main pain points right now? Why are they seeking a solution now? What prevented them before?

Competition

How are they dealing with these challenges? Do they currently use any competing products or vendors? What other solutions are they evaluating?

Why Our Solution?

What unique value does our solution provide for the prospect? What benefits or features are they most interested in?

Timeline

What is the timeline for implementation? When does the potential customer need a solution in place by?

Budget

What are they currently spending on this issue? Do they have a budget allocated for it? If not, when do they expect they will?

Causes for Concern

Has the potential customer raised any concerns about our offering? What obstacles could crop up and derail implementation? How can we address these?

Other Helpful Notes

Are there any other topics or discussion points you should note and share with colleagues?

Main Takeaways

Do you qualify this lead as an ideal long-term successful customer? Why or why not?

Take Action

What are the next steps? Share key information and actionable steps with your team.

Sales Stand-Up

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Team, Product, and/or Company Updates

Create urgency; remind team of upcoming due dates and sales deadlines. 

Announce product changes. Welcome new team members. Provide other updates relevant to the day-to-day (i.e. company holidays, policy changes, staff vacations, etc.)

Coaching

Review one to two potential sales, system or process improvements (i.e. maximizing sales tools, writing great emails, etc.)

Celebrate Small Wins

Provide an update on who has been hitting their numbers. Recognize top performers.

Motivate

Share thought-provoking insights, quotes, or other motivational content. Get the team thinking high-level.

Takeaways

What will you take away from this meeting into your day? Open the floor for reps to share their takeaways for the day’s stand up. 

 ---

Action items:


Notes:


Sales/Customer Success Hand-off

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Customer Account Information: 

Company Name: 

Industry/Sector:

Company Size:

Contract Sign Date:

Contract Length:

Customer Team Information:

First touch: 

Most engaged user:

Buying Decision Maker:

Team who will be using the product the most:

Internal Team Information:

Customer Success Manager:

Sales Team Member:

Other Key Stakeholders & Their Roles:

Customer High Level Goals

What is the main business objective of the customer? How do they generate revenue?

Why Our Solution?

What challenges or pain points does our product solve for the customer? What benefits or features are they most interested in?

Is the customer migrating from a competitor? Why?

Defining Success (Customer)

How will the customer determine if our product is helping them meet their business goals? 

Defining Success (Internally)

What key metrics will we use to make sure the customer is healthy and we are successful? 

Some suggestions (find this information in Vitally):

NPS Score

Health Score

Average MRR/ARR

Number of Users

Product Usage

Product Setup

Work & Communication Style

What is the customer's ideal working relationship? What is the best way to contact them?

Growth Opportunities

How can we tailor the product or experience to better suit the customer? What features do we want to encourage the customer to use based on their business goals?

Red Flags & Risks

Were there any hesitations or hiccups encountered during the sales process? How can we ensure these don’t happen during and after the customer handoff?

Next Steps for Team

What do we need to do next to keep the customer healthy? List all actionable steps and the team member responsible for each one.

Next Steps for Customer

What are the next steps for the customer? Is any training required? More feature implementation?

Other Important Notes

Is there any other information worth sharing?

Note Actions

Add Vitally for the suggested metrics

VC Pitch Meeting

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Team

  • Founding story and insights
  • Overview of key team members

Business Overview

  • Market size and dynamics
  • Product overview: why is it 10x better?  
  • Where does it go from here?
  • Go-to-market: what is the distribution and customer acquisition model?
  • Why will you succeed?

Metrics

  • Market size and dynamics
  • Key growth or financial metrics, KPIs
  • Customers  
  • Cash burn, runway

Competitive landscape

  • Competitor #1
  • Competitor #2
  • How is the company differentiated, why will it win, or what makes it 10x better?

Funding history

  • Capital raised to date, main investors, date of last financing
  • Fundraising plans

Next steps

  • Follow up plan
Sales & Partnerships

Agenda Template FAQs

How do you prepare for a customer meeting?

Whether your next customer meeting is your first or 15th with that client, you need an agenda. To build an agenda, you focus should be on answer these three questions:

  1. What is the current state of the customer’s progress toward their goals?
  2. What issues need to be solved to move the customer closer to their goals?
  3. How can these issues be solved?

How to specifically structure your agenda may vary based on your customer, but our library of 80+ meeting agenda examples should give you a good starting point.

How do you start a customer meeting?

As you get your meeting started, you want to grab everyone’s attention, set expectations, and then launch right into it!

  1. While small-talk is great for building rapport before a meeting, don’t let the chatter go on more than a couple of minutes into the official meeting time
  2. If there are participants who don’t know each other, introduce them (and yourself!)
  3. As you get the meeting started, reaffirm why you’re meeting, and what everyone will get out of it. Spending 20 seconds summarizing the agenda shows that you have and plan and you’re in control
How do you end a customer meeting?

As you wrap up your customer meeting, you should revisit any action items you’ve noted during the meeting and affirm that you’re on top of things. This is a good time to note who will be responsible for what, and when the customer can expect an update.
Then, end on a positive note, showing enthusiasm for your partnership and thanking your customer for their time.

How do you have an amazing first client meeting?

Relax and smile
You may be stressed in an attempt to get started on the right foot. Don’t let that impact your body language (even on video conferencing).
 
Offer something of value for free
In addition to any materials in your welcome package, set the stage for a strong relationship by making an offer. This could be a resource, like a research or an ebook, or it could be to set up a training or consultation. It could even be minor, like providing advice based on the customer and your experience with other customers like them. Whatever it is, find a way to show your client that you’re deeply invested in their success.

Listen more than you speak
You may have landed this client, but you still have a lot to learn about their expectations, goals, and priorities. Ask a lot of questions, and listen actively. Even if you think you already know the answers, being a good listener will help build rapport, and you never know—you may learn something incredibly valuable after all.

Be specific about what you offer and how you can help
A common pitfall in initial client meetings is to be overly general. Instead, now is the time to be specific. What exactly will you do together? Who, how much, how often, measured in what way?

Do you have a guide to running great customer meetings?

As a matter of fact, we do. This short, downloadable guide walks you through running a customer meeting that both strengthens customer relationships and improves company wide collaboration.

Get your free download:
The Art of the Customer Meeting.

How do you run a design meeting?

How to run your design meeting will depend a lot on what kind of design meeting it is. Is this a sync up between just a PM (or other product owner) and the designer? Is it a weekly meeting for the design team? A critique? Or is it a cross-functional meeting, with many stakeholders present?
 
Each of these types of meetings requires a slightly different approach. What is common between them, is a need to be upfront and clear about what the goals of the meeting are (and what they aren’t).

For example, here are some typical examples of design meetings:

  • Brainstorm approaches for an early design
  • Seek feedback on an in-progress design
  • Get buy-in on a nearly completed design
  • Plan, decide, and organize your team’s design process
Should non-designers be invited to a design meeting?

Successful design projects usually need involvement from other stakeholders, but too much meddling can throw a wrench in the design process. As a general rule (that can sometimes be broken), input from non-designers is the most helpful at the beginning and end of a design process.

Early in the project, in the research phase, non-designers can be incredibly helpful. They can clarify how a design will be used, describe customer needs, and reveal requirements that might not be obvious about how the design should be used. If designers have experimented with multiple approaches to a problem, it can be useful to share these sketches early on.

Once the design specifications are clear, however, it’s often a good idea to let designers and project people iterate through the problem in a small team with minimal distraction. It’s during this time that small details can become a distraction for non-designers.

When a design is nearly complete, it’s once again helpful to invite key stakeholders to make sure the design is successful, and get buy-in before more resources are invested in making the design come to life.

How do you have a good team meeting?

Consider what can be removed from your agenda… and your invite list
Possibly the most common complaint about team meetings is that they are a waste of time. So the first step toward having a good team meeting is asking yourself whether everything on your agenda needs to be part of the meeting, and whether everyone needs to be there. By keeping a tight agenda and a smaller group, you’re sending a signal that people’s time is important.

Share your agenda in advance
Speaking of agendas, be prepared. Share your agenda in advance, so that the rest of the team know what will be discussed. This way, they can prepare their thoughts, and the meeting will run smoothly. If you surprise people with topics, those parts of a meeting can take longer.

Let other people talk
Many leaders and executives make the mistake of thinking that if they are running a meeting, they need to talk the whole time. Instead of Presenting on a topic for 30 or 60 minutes, structure your meeting so that others participate and even take the spotlight. 

For a more in-depth structure to follow, check out Vital Meetings, the free guide to having shorter, fewer, and better meetings.

How do you make sure real decisions are made in executive meetings?

With executive time being so valuable, it’s important that exec meetings focus not on information sharing, but rather on discussion that leads to decision-making.

One strategy that works here, is to use action-oriented agendas. For example, instead of an agenda item called, “Priorities for next quarter” make a bold statement on your agenda: “Decide on top 3 priorities for next quarter.” This leaves no wiggle room for failing to meet the goal of the meeting.

If you’re a manager or leader, how much time should you spend in meetings?

If you take a look inside a manager’s calendar, it’s not uncommon to see 50-90% of their time blocked off in meetings. At first glance, this seems to make sense. If your primary function is leadership, should you spend the majority of your time with others? However, this kind of distribution often doesn’t leave enough time for strategic thinking and planning.

If you’re attending lots of meetings out of a need to stay in the loop, a better approach is to ask your team to take notes on important meetings, and share them with you (and other relevant stakeholders). A meeting management platform like Hugo can help, and many managers whose teams use Hugo report spending 20-50% less time in meetings because they can rely on skimming notes for less important meetings instead.

What is an HR meeting?

HR (human resources) is responsible for supporting recruitment, hiring, training, and managing. HR professionals meet with job applicants and current workers to support these goals in a variety of meetings, ranging from job interviews, to trainings, to one-on-one coaching sessions.

What should you do if HR wants to meet with you about your behavior?

If your behavior at work is in the process of being addressed, you may need to meet with HR. This can be a stressful situation, but ultimately, if you handle yourself professionally, you should be able to come out of the meeting in good shape (and keep your job).

Here are a key tips to keep in mind:

  • Request examples of behaviors that need to be addressed
  • Write down any specific requests
  • Ask for clarification to avoid misunderstandings
  • Listen and repeat back what you hear to show you are listening
  • Take ownership of your mistakes
  • Ask for help if you need it
  • Show your commitment by setting clear next steps
  • Stay positive (and avoid being defensive)
  • Say thank you. Be gracious for the opportunity to improve
How do I tell my boss about a bad co-worker?
  • Schedule a meeting so that you know you have private time set aside to have the conversation
  • Focus on the behavior, not the person. Avoid personal attacks and instead focus on what they are doing
  • Show up prepared. Put some thought into what you want to say. Taking notes about the behavior in question may help
  • Stick to the facts, and not what you think someone is thinking/feeling
  • Keep a cool head. Even if the issue is serious, try to avoid arguing, shouting, and cursing
  • Request help in finding a solution
How should you handle yourself in an HR meeting?
  • Focus on the facts of the situation
  • Be calm, even when under pressure
  • Consider other people’s points of view
  • Be aware of negative body language
  • Practice good listening. (Don’t cut anyone off)
  • Make sure your effort matches the importance of the issue. (Don’t go crazy over something small)
Who should be at a marketing meeting?

Invite necessary decision-makers, but don’t cast too wide of a net. Since marketing often involves or impacts a lot of departments, it can be tempting to invite a lot of people to some marketing meetings. Instead, try to pair it down. If someone is being invited to the meeting only as an FYI, send them meeting notes instead.

How do you set an agenda for a marketing meeting?

The common structure for many marketing meetings is the following:

What are common types of marketing meetings?
How do you make team meetings more engaging?

The best meetings involve the whole room, not just one or two presenters. Here are a few ways to encourage more engagement:

  • Ask others to contribute to the agenda. Having a shared agenda helps everyone in the room feel responsible for the meeting’s success.
  • Make small talk as people are settling in. When you show up early, get the conversation flowing instead of burying your head in your laptop or your phone.
  • Don’t do all the talking. Invite fellow participants to lead discussions and provide updates.
  • Give updates before the meeting. Provide materials to review before the meeting so that you can focus on the discussion and decision-making when everyone is together.
  • Do a deep dive into one topic. Focus on a single challenge to tap into the collective intelligence of everyone attending.
  • Keep a sense of humor. Cracking the occasional joke will help meeting participants feel open to expressing their own ideas.
What agenda topics are most common in team meetings?

Team meetings are among the most common and most important meetings in any workplace. Agendas for these types of meetings range wildly, but all topics usually fall into one of these categories:

  • Introductions. If they don’t already, make sure everyone in the room knows who each other are.
  • Updates. Updates are extremely common in team meetings, but often they are also the hog a lot of time without providing a lot of value. Summarize updates on the agenda when possible and keep them brief.
  • Discussions.
  • Decisions. If a decision needs to be reached during the meeting, note it explicitly on the agenda.
  • Next steps. While not a significant part of the agenda, it’s important to always agree on action items from a meeting and who owns them.
What are some fun and cool team meeting ideas?
  • Go around the table with an icebreaker. Get to know each other by having everyone answer the same question.
  • Change up the location. Get out of the conference room and into the break room, or on the lawn outside.
  • Start at a weird time. Pick something memorable like 1:23 pm.
  • Get some exercise. Switch things up during a long meeting by having everyone take a run around the block, do as many pushups they can do, or some other physical activity to get the blood pumping.
  • Pass out prizes. Have a pile or swag, or candy bars, or coffee gift cards up at the front of the room. Whenever someone makes a spectacular contribution, toss them a prize.
What are good questions to ask in a one-on-one?

Personal/rapport-building:

  • What worries you? What keeps you up at night?
  • What are you most excited about?
  • How’s life outside work?
  • What do you like to do on the weekends?
  • Do you feel like you’re making progress on your career goals?
  • What are your big dreams in life outside of work?

Career growth:

  • What skills would you like to develop?
  • Do you feel challenged in your role?
  • Is there any training or education we should be investing in for you?
  • How do you see your role evolving?
  • Do you feel like you’re making progress on your career goals?
  • Who in the company would you like to learn from?

Giving/receiving feedback:

  • Do you feel you’re getting enough feedback?
  • What’s an area where you would like help or coaching?
  • What’s an aspect of your job you’d like to improve?
  • How can I help you be more effective?
  • What is something I can do better?
  • What have past managers done that you’d like me to do as well?
Why have one-on-ones with your employees?

One-on-one meetings have many benefits:

  • Help employees build better relationships with their managers 
  • Provide opportunities for coaching and training
  • Encourage employees to feel valued at work
  • Discuss performance and areas of improvement
  • Find out what employees are (and are not) excited about
  • Learn how managers can better help employees
Who should set the agenda for a one-on-one meeting?

It’s good for the employee to feel ownership of their one-on-one because the meeting is primarily for their benefit. So, rather than having a manager set the agenda every time, the majority of the agenda should be driven by the employee. Of course, there should still be opportunities for managers to lead the conversation, especially when it comes to topics like coaching and performance. Using a meeting notes app that allows for easy, collaborative agendas can help.

Should one-on-one be hyphenated?

Yes. The word one-on-one is always hyphenated, regardless of whether it is used as a noun, adjective, and adverb.

What are other ways to spell one-on-one?

Writing all three hyphenated words out as one-on-one can be tedious. For brevity in your calendar invites, try using: "1:1" or "Name <> Name."

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